Ray Of Hope Church Of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Inc.
The LGBTQIS Pride Activities, and Social Events Center of Elmira NY
The only Church in Central New York founded and fostered by the GLBTQIS community for 38 years. October 31, 2021 - 38th Anniversary now in our 39th year in Ministry.
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Welcome to our Black History Month Section, Page 2  To return to Page 1 Click here
Page updated
2/20/21
5:31 p.m.

 

Produced by Blackside, Eyes on the Prize tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today. Winner of numerous Emmy Awards, a George Foster Peabody Award, an International Documentary Award, and a Television Critics Association Award, Eyes on the Prize is the most critically acclaimed documentary on civil rights in America.

 

Eyes on the Prize recounts the fight to end decades of discrimination and segregation. It is the story of the people - young and old, male and female, northern and southern - who, compelled by a meeting of conscience and circumstance, worked to eradicate a world where whites and blacks could not go to the same school, ride the same bus, vote in the same election, or participate equally in society. It was a world in which peaceful demonstrators were met with resistance and brutality - in short, a reality that is now nearly incomprehensible to many young Americans.

**These DVD's are available from many sources including PBS.Org ,www.facinghistory.org, Vimeo, and on YouTube.

Stream the Eyes on the Prize Video Collection

Produced by Blackside, Inc. and nationally broadcast on PBS, this comprehensive 14-part television documentary series about the American Civil Rights Movement utilizes rare historical film and interviews with participants from pivotal moments in the struggle for civil rights. Users are required to log in to view and stream the full collection of videos. Facing History also has an Eyes on the Prize study guide that provides a framework for using the series in classrooms, important primary sources, and guiding questions to help teachers bring the history of the civil rights movement alive. Students may see themselves in the young people of the movement who chose to participate, tapping into their own power to fight for justice and equity.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5850974410001_5850974080001-vs.jpg?itok=gSX2qkU0

Eyes on the Prize: Awakenings (1954 - 1956)

Episode 1 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" focuses on the early years of struggle for black freedom, including the lynching of Emmett Till, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the formation of the SCLC.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5852445638001_5851862196001-vs.jpg?itok=yik3USfa

Eyes on the Prize: Fighting Back (1957-1962)

Episode 2 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" traces the African American community's rejection of "separate but equal" education.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5852476701001_5851862706001-vs.jpg?itok=6a3VsBQZ

Eyes on the Prize: Ain't Scared of Your Jails (1960-1961)

Episode 3 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" focuses on the participation of young people, including the formation of SNCC, college students' participation in lunch counter sit-ins, and the Freedom Rides.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5969120869001_5851941909001-vs.jpg?itok=12Ym5Wr4

Eyes on the Prize: No Easy Walk (1962 - 1966)

Episode 4 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" examines the emergence of mass demonstrations, documenting the march of Alabama school children against the spray of fire hoses and the historic 1963 March on Washington, DC.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5851945302001_5851945387001-vs.jpg?itok=1RwArOET

Eyes on the Prize: Mississippi: Is This America? (1962-1964)

Episode 5 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" focuses on the extraordinary personal risks that citizens faced as they assumed responsibility for social change, particularly during the 1962-64 voting rights campaign in Mississippi.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5850974410001_5850974080001-vs.jpg?itok=gSX2qkU0

Eyes on the Prize: Awakenings (1954-1956)

Episode 1 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" focuses on the early years of struggle for black freedom, including the lynching of Emmett Till, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the formation of the SCLC.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5852445638001_5851862196001-vs.jpg?itok=yik3USfa

Eyes on the Prize: Fighting Back (1957-1962)

Episode 2 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" traces the African American community's rejection of "separate but equal" education.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5852476701001_5851862706001-vs.jpg?itok=6a3VsBQZ

Eyes on the Prize: Ain't Scared of Your Jails (1960-1961)

Episode 3 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" focuses on the participation of young people, including the formation of SNCC, college students' participation in lunch counter sit-ins, and the Freedom Rides.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5969120869001_5851941909001-vs.jpg?itok=12Ym5Wr4

Eyes on the Prize: No Easy Walk (1962 - 1966)

Episode 4 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" examines the emergence of mass demonstrations, documenting the march of Alabama school children against the spray of fire hoses and the historic 1963 March on Washington, DC.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5851945302001_5851945387001-vs.jpg?itok=1RwArOET

Eyes on the Prize: Mississippi: Is This America? (1962-1964)

Episode 5 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" focuses on the extraordinary personal risks that citizens faced as they assumed responsibility for social change, particularly during the 1962-64 voting rights campaign in Mississippi.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853347289001_5851970999001-vs.jpg?itok=w9Mcp4zR

Eyes on the Prize: Bridge to Freedom (1965)

Episode 6 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" opens with the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery and explores the drive to make voting rights a national issue.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853347317001_5851979080001-vs.jpg?itok=Bdn8TBXO

Eyes on the Prize: The Time Has Come (1964 - 1966)

Episode 7 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" examines Malcolm X and his influence, the struggle to develop new goals and create new strategies in the post-voting rights era, and the call for "Black Power."

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5855391986001_5855312374001-vs.jpg?itok=tC7LE-9k

Eyes on the Prize: Two Societies (1965-1968)

Episode 8 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" explores the civil rights movement in northern cities, including the 1967 uprising in Detroit.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853347324001_5852000151001-vs.jpg?itok=YTZLjCKi

Eyes on the Prize: Power! (1966-1968)

Episode 9 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" traces the political path to power for Carl Stokes, the founding of the Black Panther Party, and the education experiment in New York's Ocean Hill-Brownsville neighborhood.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853361622001_5853356619001-vs.jpg?itok=JaOVwCqa

Eyes on the Prize: The Promised Land (1967-1968)

Episode 10 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" illustrates connections between the war in Vietnam and poverty in the US, analyzes the positions of Martin Luther King Jr., and discusses King's assassination.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853347325001_5852012756001-vs.jpg?itok=uLmBC86B

Eyes on the Prize: Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More (1964 - 1972)

Episode 11 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" chronicles Muhammad Ali's career, describes the movement at Howard University for black studies, and documents the National Black Political Convention at Gary, Indiana.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853361617001_5853353708001-vs.jpg?itok=0fLSROML

Eyes on the Prize: A Nation of Law (1968-1971)

Episode 12 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" examines the government's response to the Black Panther Party in Chicago and the FBI's covert program to disrupt and neutralize black organizations, including the Black Panthers.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5852019520001_5852017917001-vs.jpg?itok=HWLpaUVZ

Eyes on the Prize: The Keys to the Kingdom (1974 - 1980)

Episode 13 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" describes the desegregation and busing of Boston Public Schools, assesses the success of affirmative action in Atlanta, and examines the case of medical student Alan Bakke.

https://www.facinghistory.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/brightcove_thumbnail/1513023957001_5853347331001_5852440384001-vs.jpg?itok=x6luCvgk

Eyes on the Prize: Back to the Movement (1979-mid 1980s)

Episode 14 of "Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Movement" contrasts Miami and Chicago in the early 1980s, traces the election of Harold Washington as Chicago's first black mayor, and explores themes of power and powerlessness.

 

14 episodes on 7 DVDs, 55 minutes each
Source: PBS Video

A comprehensive television documentary about the American Civil Rights Movement, utilizing rare historical film and present-day interviews. 

Disc 1:
1. Awakenings (1954 - 1956)
Focuses on the Mississippi lynching of 14-year-old Emmett Till and the subsequent trial; Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott; the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; and the entry of ordinary citizens and local leaders into the black struggle for freedom

2. Fighting Back (1957 - 1962)
Traces the African American community's rejection of "separate but equal" education, from the Supreme Court's historic Brown v. Board of Education decision to the efforts of the first black high school and college students to integrate white schools.

Disc 2:
3. Ain't Scared of Your Jails (1960 - 1961)
Chronicles the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the participation of young people and college students in lunch counter sit-ins and Freedom Rides, as well as the Civil Rights Movement's influence on the 1960 presidential campaign.

4. No Easy Walk (1962 - 66)
Examines the emergence of mass demonstrations and marches as a powerful form of protest by documenting the anti-segregation march of Alabama school children against the spray of fire hoses and the historic 1963 March on Washington, DC. 

Disc 3:
5. Mississippi: Is This America? (1962 - 1964)
Focuses on the extraordinary personal risks that citizens faced as they assumed responsibility for social change, particularly during the 1962-64 voting rights campaign in Mississippi. The state became a testing ground of constitutional principles as civil rights activists concentrated their energies on the right to vote. White resistance to the sharing of political power clashed with the strong determination of movement leaders to bring Mississippi blacks to the ballot box. In Freedom Summer 1964, tension between white resistance and civil rights activists reached its height in the tragic murder of three young civil rights workers.

6. Bridge to Freedom (1965)
Opens with the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery and explores the drive to make voting rights a national issue, examining ideological differences within the movement and the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Disc 4:
7. The Time Has Come (1964-1966)
Introduces the early 1960s African American community outside the southern-based freedom movement. It describes the rise and transformation of Malcolm X and his influence; demonstrates the movement's struggle to develop new goals and create new strategies in the post-voting rights era; and examines the context of the call for "Black Power."

8. Two Societies (1965-1968)
Explores the southern Civil Rights Movement's first attempt at organizing in the North; presents the frustration and desire for change felt by black residents of northern cities; looks at the 1967 uprising in Detroit; and witnesses the end of an era for the Civil Rights Movement as President Johnson turns his attention to other matters.

Disc 5:
9. Power! (1966-1968)
Traces the political path to power for Carl Stokes, describes the founding of the Black Panther Party, and examines the education experiment in New York's Ocean Hill-Brownsville section.

10. The Promised Land (1967-1968)
Illustrates connections between the war in Vietnam and the problem of poverty in the United States, analyzes the controversial positions taken by Martin Luther King, and discusses the assassination of King and the nationwide reaction to his death.

Disc 6:
11. Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More (1964-1972)
Chronicles Mohammed Ali's career, describes the student movement at Howard University for Black Studies, and documents the events of the National Black Political Convention at Gary, Indiana.

12. A Nation of Law (1968-1971)
Examines the government's response to the Black Panther Party in Chicago and rebelling inmates at Attica Correctional Facility, chronicles the FBI's covert program to disrupt and neutralize black organizations, and specifically documents the activities of an FBI informant who infiltrated the Black Panther Party.

Disc 7:
13. The Keys to the Kingdom (1974-1980)
Describes the desegregation and busing of Boston public schools following the 1974 court order, assesses the success of affirmative action in Atlanta, Georgia, and examines the case of medical student Alan Bakke.

14. Back to the Movement (1979-mid 1980s)
Contrasts the communities of Miami and Chicago in the early 1980s, traces the election of Harold Washington to the position of Chicago's first black mayor, and explores the themes of power and powerlessness.

 

Ray Of Hope

Church Of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Inc.

is the original Church in Central New York for

ALL People, including but not limited to

persons who are or might be:

Straight, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual,

Transgender,

Questioning,

Intersex, Queer,

Asexual, Pansexual, Hetero-flexible. 

Anyone who is human!

Married, divorced, remarried, single,

and persons of all gender expressions.

Persons of any faith / religion or

no faith, no religion, or have no idea where to start with religion.

A spiritual home for those who are "spiritual but not religious."

WHAT WE ARE TRYING TO TELL Y OU IS WE ARE

the Church by us, for us, 4 U!

The Church made by you because

we  ARE  you!

Ray Of Hope Church was founded in 1983

and is serving Syracuse, Ithaca and Elmira New York.

We are in fact serving the world with live interactive worship services,

Bible enrichment sessions, and meetings

through SKYPE on the Internet.

WE  ARE  YOU!

We never held a vote to decide if we would be an INCLUSIVE church for you.

WE  ARE  YOU!

We are not an OPEN AND AFFIRMING church for you.

WE  ARE  YOU!

We are not a RECONCILING CHURCH or

RECONCILING  CONGREGATION for you.

WE  ARE  YOU!

We are not an OPEN MINDED or ACCEPTING or WELCOMING

 church where you can attend as long as you blend in quietly and discretely.

WE  ARE  YOU!

THIS is the church where YOU belong.

Ray Of Hope Church is the church

by us, for us, and made by You.

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Read the official STUDY GUIDE for the series Eyes On The Prize.  Right click or use the open in a new window command to keep this page open as well. Click here.
June 19 is Juneteenth. Two and one half years after the Emancipation Proclamation became law on January 1, 1863 there were still African - American slaves in the United States.  They were set free on June 19, 1865.  Read more about this here:  click here.

FAMOUS AND NOTABLE LGBT AFRICAN AMERICAN PEOPLE.  This list was made by GLAAD and can be seen here www.glaad.org/publications/blackhistorymonthkit

Alice Walker: author, poet, and advocate
Alvin Ailey: 
choreographer and advocate
Andre Leon Talley: 
editor-at-large for Vogue magazine, current contributing editor
Angela Davis: 
political advocate, scholar, and author
Audre Lorde: 
author and advocate
Azealia Banks, 
musician
Bayard Rustin: 
chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington, advisor to Martin Luther King Jr.
Bessie Smith: 
blues singer
Bill T. Jones: 
artistic director, choreographer and dancer
Countee Cullen: 
poet
Darryl Stevens: 
actor
Don Lemon: 
reporter for CNN and news anchor
Doug Spearman: 
actor
E. Denise Simmons: 
mayor of Cambridge, Massachusetts, during the 2008-2009 term, first openly lesbian African American mayor in the United States
E. Lyn Harris: 
author
Emil Wilbekin: 
former openly gay Editor-in-Chief of Vibe Magazine, current managing editor of Essence.com
Felicia "Snoop" Pearson: 
actress
Frenchie Davis: 
musician
Frank Ocean, 
musician
Glen Burke: 
Major League Baseball player
Isis King: 
America's Next Top Model contestant
James Baldwin: 
author
Janet Mock, 
activist, author
Jasika Nicole: 
actress
Jean-Michel Basquiat: 
artist
John Amaechi:
 former NBA player
Josephine Baker: 
dancer, singer, and actress
June Jordan: 
author
Kevin Aviance: 
female impressionist and entertainer
Kylar Broadus, 
lawyer, first trans-identified person to testify before Congress 
LZ Granderson: 
ESPN.com columnist
Langston Hughes: 
poet and social advocate
Laverne Cox: 
actress, producer and transgender advocate
Lee Daniels: 
film producer and director
Linda Villaros: 
author, journalist and public speaker
Ma Rainey: 
blues singer
Maurice Jamal: 
filmmaker and director
Meshell Ndegeocello: 
singer
Paris Barclay: 
television director and producer
Patrik-Ian Polk: 
director, producer, screenwriter, singer and actor
Roy Simmons: 
former NFL player
RuPaul: 
actor, drag queen and singer-songwriter
Sheryl Swoopes: 
WNBA player
Stacy Ann Chin: 
author and poet
Tracy Chapman: 
singer
Wade Davis, 
former NFL player
Wanda Sykes: 
actress and comedian

Bayard Rustin

By Dani Heffernan, Senior Media Strategist at GLAAD | 

February 13, 2012

https://www.glaad.org/sites/default/files/styles/medium/public/bayardrustin_4.jpg?itok=paR9HXg3Throughout Black History Month, schools and community centers around the country will be screening the documentary film, Brother Outsider. The film chronicles the life of Bayard Rustin, an openly gay African American man who worked for more than 50 years as an advocate and strategist for various human rights initiatives. He most famously advised Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and was the chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom where King made his infamous "I Have a Dream" speech. Yet, because he was gay, Rustin's work and accomplishments were often carried out behind the scenes, and his legacy remains less well known than that of many of his contemporaries. Today, on the GLAAD blog, we are taking the time to highlight the life of Bayard Rustin, as well as the lives of other 'brother outsiders' from our history, who dealt with both racism and homophobia as they paved the way for others.

Bayard Rustin was born in 1912 and grew up in West Chester, Pennsylvania. He became involved with activist work after moving to New York in his early twenties. Rustin joined countless organizations, both domestic and international, throughout his life, and was committed to the pacifist teachings of his Quaker upbringing. He was arrested and incarcerated many times in his life for protesting war, racism in the South, and colonial rule in Africa, among other reasons. While in India, Rustin embraced Gandhi's policy of non-violence, a practice he persuaded Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and participants in the Montgomery Bus Boycott to adopt.

Timeline Of The Civil Rights Movement
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  This is a timeline of the civil rights movement, a nonviolent freedom movement to gain legal equality and the enforcement of constitutional rights for African Americans.
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.  THIS IS THE MOST EXTENSIVE LIST OF IMPORTANT DATES WITH SOURCES.  CLICK HERE.
Timeline of African-American history
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.  THIS IS THE MOST EXTENSIVE LIST OF IMPORTANT DATES WITH SOURCES.  CLICK HERE.
The civil rights leader and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. aide, Rev. Dr. Joseph Lowery has been promoted to Paradise at the age of 98.  One famous expression of his: "We ask you to help us work for that day when black will not be asked to get in back; when brown can stick around; when yellow will be mellow; when the red man can get ahead, man; and when white will embrace what is right," Lowery prayed at President Barack Obama's inaugural benediction in 2009. To read more about Rev. Lowery Click Here.  To hear the prayer he prayed at President Obama's Click Here.  (3-28-20 11:24 a.m.)
To read about the Tulsa massacre CLICK HERE.
See this documentary BLACK WALL STREET; Tulsa's Dirty Little Secret, CLICK HERE.
There were reports that white men flew airplanes above Greenwood, dropping kerosene bombs. "Tulsa was likely the first city" in the United States "to be bombed from the air," according to a 2001 report by the Oklahoma Commission to Study the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921.  Read more of this article that appeared in the Washington Post CLICK HERE.

From rogerebert.com:

When the 13th amendment was ratified in 1865, its drafters left themselves a large, very exploitable loophole in the guise of an easily missed clause in its definition. That clause, which converts slavery from a legal business model to an equally legal method of punishment for criminals, is the subject of the Netflix documentary "13th." Premiering tonight at the New York Film Festival, "13th" is the first documentary to open the festival in its 54 year history. Director Ava DuVernay's takes an unflinching, well-informed and thoroughly researched look at the American system of incarceration, specifically how the prison industrial complex affects people of color. Her analysis could not be more timely nor more infuriating. The film builds its case piece by shattering piece, inspiring levels of shock and outrage that stun the viewer, leaving one shaken and disturbed before closing out on a visual note of hope designed to keep us on the hook as advocates for change.

From Wikipedia:
13th is a 2016 American documentary by director Ava DuVernay. The film explores the "intersection of race, justice, and mass incarceration in the United States;"[3] it is titled after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1865, which abolished slavery throughout the United States and ended involuntary servitude except as a punishment for conviction of a crime.

DuVernay contends that slavery has been perpetuated since the end of the American Civil War through criminalizing behavior and enabling police to arrest poor freedmen and force them to work for the state under convict leasing; suppression of African Americans by disenfranchisement, lynchings and Jim Crow; politicians declaring a war on drugs that weighs more heavily on minority communities and, by the late 20th century, mass incarceration of people of color in the United States. She examines the prison-industrial complex and the emerging detention-industrial complex, discussing how much money is being made by corporations from such incarcerations.

To keep reading Click Here.

Filmmaker Ava DuVernay explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on the fact that the nation's prisons are disproportionately filled with African-Americans.
Release date: October 7, 2016 (USA)
Director: Ava DuVernay
Awards: BAFTA Award for Best Documentary, MORE
Producers: Ava DuVernay, Spencer Averick, Howard Barish
Production companies: Forward Movement, Kandoo Films
See the documentary on YouTube  Click Here.

To read a great tribute article and see a short film tribute to Congressman John Lewis in the Washington Post Click Here.

James Baldwin
(1924-1987) American writer and activist.

James Baldwin was born the in Harlem, New York and was the eldest of nine children. As a youth Baldwin was verbally abused by his stepfather who often referred to him as the “ugliest child he had ever seen.” Baldwin attended DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx, where he felt what he described as the “stigma of being Negro”. After graduating high school he worked a series of low paying jobs to support his siblings. As a youth Baldwin began to feel stifled by being both an African American in a racist society, and a gay man in the homophobic African American community. In 1948 at the age of 24 Baldwin decided to move to France to escape his unfortunate predicaments.  While in France Baldwin became an avid writer and poet. With the encouragement and constant support of his best friend and lover Lucien Happersberger, he was able to publish a number of poems and novels. In 1956, Baldwin’s novel Giovanni’s Room, which told the story of a white man torn between his love for a man and a woman, brought him critical acclaim as a powerful American writer. Baldwin’s greatest influence on the life of his times stemmed from his numerous essay collections: Notes of a Native Son (1955), Nobody Knows My Name (1960), and The Fire Next Time (1963). Aside from literature, Baldwin was against the Vietnam War and an outspoken advocate of Gay and Lesbian Rights. He also made valuable contributions to the African American Civil Rights Movement.  Source: Gender And Sexuality Sudent Services of the University Of Illinois Springfield.  Visit their web site Click Here.
CATHOLIC SISTERS MARCHED IN SELMA ON ALL THREE STARTS OF THE MARCH in 1965.
Here is one article about the second march, March 10, 1965.
When six Catholic nuns from St. Louis boarded a chartered plane headed for Selma, Alabama, in the early morning hours of March 10, 1965, they had no idea they were about to change their own destinies and the lives of many American women religious. Traveling with 48 other men and women from a variety of faith traditions, the sisters were scheduled to join hundreds of demonstrators in a voting rights’ march scheduled for later that morning in Selma. Clothed in their floor-length, traditional habits of black serge wool and veils, the nuns were swarmed by the media and their photographs and subsequent interviews filled the front pages of many national newspapers, providing the lead story for national television networks over the next few days.

In reality, the sisters and those they marched with walked only about a block that day before they were stopped by Alabama troopers and a sheriff’s posse; but that short walk helped propel American Catholic sisters into a new era that forever changed the face of religious life and would inevitably redefine how sisters understood and acted upon social justice issues for the rest of the century.
Continue reading this interesting article Click Here.
MORE SISTERS OF SELMA

To commemorate women’s history month and the 50th anniversary of the marches from Selma to Montgomery that helped reform voting rights, the Special Collections Research Center at Morris Library is showing the film, Sisters of Selma: Bearing Witness for Change to commemorate women’s history month and the 50-year anniversary of the marches from Selma to Montgomery that helped reform voting rights,. This film will be shown on March 24th at 6:00 P.M. in the Hall of Presidents and Chancellors at SIU Carbondale’s Morris Library.










March 25, 2015, marks the 50th Anniversary of the March on Selma. To commemorate this event, one of the “Sisters of Selma” Antona Ebo will address the SIU community here in Morris Library. Sister Mary Antona Ebo is a legendary trailblazer. Complementing her lifetime career in health services, Sister Antona gained national recognition for her pioneering efforts in civil rights as a black Catholic nun. The image of her marching in 1965 in Selma, Alabama became an icon during the struggle for voting rights.  This event will include remarks from Father Joseph Brown, professor of Africana Studies at SIU Carbondale, songs by the Voices of Inspiration and the Africana Theater Lab, and a lecture by Sister Antona.  March 25th at 2:00 P.M., in Third Floor Rotunda in Morris Library.  Continue reading Click Here.
To see this video CLICK HERE.
To read the text of this historical speech  CLICK HERE.
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom: 1963 Archival Footage.  The chief organizer of this historic event was a gay man, Bayard Rustin.  See the window below this one for more information about Mr. Rustin.  This March on Washington video was promoted by the SALT project.  Here is their introduction:  In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, here's a lovely two-minute immersion in amazing archival footage from the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. No doubt Dr. King would want us to remember and celebrate all the people who made the march possible - inspiring us 57 years later to keep working, marching, and fighting for jobs, freedom, equal rights, liberation, inclusivity, and a world where Black lives truly matter.

We wanted to make this labor of love available for congregations and individuals everywhere, so download and share it far and wide: in worship, on social media, on your website, with your family and friends. Let freedom ring!

saltproject.org.  To see this great video Right Click Here.
Obama Awards Bayard Rustin - the Man Behind the March - the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 8-9-2013 Huffpost article Right Click Here.